eGFI - Dream Up the Future Sign-up for The Newsletter  For Teachers Online Store Contact us Search
Read the Magazine
What's New?
Explore eGFI
Engineer your Path About eGFI
Overview Lesson Plans Class Activities Outreach Programs Web Resources Special Features K-12 Education News
  • Tag Cloud

  • What’s New?

  • Pages

  • RSS RSS

  • RSS Comments

  • Archives

  • Meta

‘Vertical’ Engineers Get Capital View

washington monument engineer1Structural engineer Emma Cardini has inspected some pretty impressive facades, including the Chicago Tribune Tower’s ornate spires and the Bridge of the Americas in Panama. Still, nothing compares with the capital bird’s eye view she literally enjoys on her latest job: rappelling down the marble sides of the Washington Monument to assess the damage from late August’s 5.8-magnitude earthquake.

Read More

Edible Green Screen

green screenHave you ever thought about those bare, exterior walls of your home or school? If so, you would be current with one of the hottest trends in civil and environmental engineering: Redesigning buildings to take full advantage of solar energy, like this “edible green screen” created by students at the University of Washington’s College of Built Environments.

The idea behind green walls, or vertical gardens, can be traced back to the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. In Babylon, plants were said to have been cultivated at a height above ground level. In modern times, the idea of similar gardens has become a way to bring more greenery to cityscapes while also making urban areas more environmentally friendly.

Read More

Feature: Barkitecture

doghouseThe Austin Barkitecture competition calls on local builders to design trendy doghouses, which are then bid on in an auction. Proceeds go to local charitable groups and community members for veterinary care, spay/neuter surgeries, and community outreach.

Read More

Lesson: Zero-Energy Home Design

building in classIn this activity, student teams in grades 9 to 12 design and build a one-bedroom model house within design constraints that uses passive solar heating techniques to heat the house and sustain that temperature as long as possible.

Read More

Feature: Solar Decathlon Powers Up

New Zealand TeamWhat does it take to build a solar village, where homes not only are designed to create more energy than they use but are comfortable and cool to look at, too? For some 19 collegiate teams from the U.S. and aborad installing their entries to the 2011 Solar Decathlon in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, the answer is: lots of hands-on work involving hammers, wrenches, plumbing, and construction cranes.

Read More

In ACE, Imagination Rules

ACE Mentor ProgramThe ACE Mentor Program, which introduces high school students to careers in architecture, construction and engineering, doesn’t think small. At one school, it asks students to design an imaginary museum dedicated to peace. At another, they’ll design a whole high school.

Read More

Feature: High Spire Act

Jonathan FoyleIn Scaling Britain, a new BBC TV program on English engineering and architecture, Jonathan Foyle clambers up iconic buildings to explore such intriguing topics as the physics of flying buttresses, and the materials science of stained glass.

Read More

Activity: Build a Paper Tower

Rolling Newspaper for Building a Paper TowerStudents in grades 5-12 try to build the tallest structure they can using only two sheets of newspaper. As they do so, they learn about building design.

Read More

Exhibit: Designing Tomorrow. Washington, DC. Oct 2010-July 2011

designingtomorrow_futurama

The Designing Tomorrow exhibit at the National Building Museum, in Washington, D.C., October 2, 2010 -July 10, 2011, explores the modernist spectacles of architecture and design Americans witnessed at the nation’s world’s fairs between 1933 and 1940 — visions of a brighter future during the worst economic crisis the United States had known. The fairs popularized modern design for the American public and promoted the idea of science and consumerism as salvation from the Great Depression.

Read More

Page 1 of 1