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No Phishing! Cybersecurity Awareness Month 2016

Cybersecurity password theftThe Department of Homeland Security designates October as National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. Its “Stop, Think, Connect” toolkit includes materials for various audiences, including students and educators, as well as guides to social media, phishing, and other topics.

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Super Small Science: Nano Videos

Nanotechnology super small science videoNanotechnology – an emerging field that measures materials in billionths of a meter – is showing up in products from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to cellphones. To help introduce this fascinating subject to K-12 students, the National Science Foundation and NBC Learn have teamed up to create a series of short videos. Nanotechnology: Super Small Science is just one of several free nanoscience and engineering education resources the federal government has developed for teachers.

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Video Snippets Show Elementary Engineering in Action

EiE Video SnippetsWhat does it mean for fourth graders to plan and carry out investigations? How can you help students develop engineering habits of mind? Engineering is Elementary’s new “video snippets” lets teachers see what integrated STEM and Next Generation Science Standards look like in real classrooms.

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Einstein Fellowships for STEM Teachers

Einstein Fellows 2014/5Ever wonder who sets STEM education policy – or yearn to influence it? Apply to become an Einstein Fellow and spend a year at the Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, NASA, NOAA, or a congressional office.

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EnergyTrends Video Contest

residential energy grid illustrationWhat do 6th and 7th graders know about where energy comes from, how much we use, and how that affects our daily lives? EnergyTrends.org is hosting a video contest for public school students to find out. Deadline is midnight May 29, 2015.

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Patent Office Debuts Innovation Site for Kids

kid inventorWhat sparks invention? Find answers on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s updated website for kids, teens, teachers, and parents. Highlights include a video series on innovation created with NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation that covers topics from 3-D printing to self-driving cars to synthetic diamonds. There also are videos showcasing teen inventors, inventor trading cards, and a “cool IP” timeline of historic patents.

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Google Funding for K-12 Computer Science

google RISE logoApplications for the 2014 Google RISE (Roots in Science and Engineering) Awards are due September 30. Organizations can receive up to $50,000 to expand successful K-12 computer science programs or include computer science in STEM programs aimed at girls and underrepresented minorities.

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New Lens on Ocean Environment

undersea coral shelfExplore dead zones and learn about threats to undersea habitats in an engaging, video-rich education program from Earth Echo International designed to empower youth to help protect “our water planet.”

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Code Calling

web color chart Computer science has the highest pay for new college graduates, twice the national average job growth of more than double the national average, and applications that stretch from rock music to medicine. Yet 9 in 10 schools don’t teach programming. Code.org hopes to change that with a host of free resources to get kids as young as four creating websites and apps.

The answer is computer programming, and advocates from Microsoft founder Bill Gates to former president Bill Clinton are pushing to include it in the K-12 curriculum.

Far from being complicated algorithms only a geek could master, code writing can be learned by just about anyone — even four-year-olds. Code.org has compiled a host of websites, courses, and other free resources to help students hone programming skills from building websites to creating phone apps. There also are tips for using code writing and programming projects and activities in math or science classes to cover content standards.

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