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Helping Hands

University of Louisville biomedical engineering students test prosthetic hand they build for LucasImagine not being able to pick up a glass of water, open a door, or play catch because you had no hands. Now imagine you’re a biomedical engineer and can help amputees regain dexterity – with the help of a home 3D printer.

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Seeing the World Through a Different Lens

dolls with disabilities Students in grades 6 to 8 gain an understanding of physical limitations and the biomedical engineering design process by performing a variety of tasks without using their thumbs, eyes, or legs, then working in teams to create or improve and adaptive device.

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Lesson: Build a Prosthetic Device

Man Running with ProstheticStudent in grades 4 – 8 are introduced to biomedical engineering and the technology of prosthetics. As they create a model prosthetic lower leg, testing its strength and considering pros and cons, they learn about issues and materials that biomedical engineers consider in designing artificial limbs.

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Custom Golf Clubs for Quadruple Amputee

Custom Golf Clubs from PINGA team of research engineers at golf equipment company PING has created a set of custom-fitted golf clubs for a man who has been a quadruple amputee since 2005. The researchers developed “a workable prototype” for Mesa, Arizona’s Jeff Lewis and worked with a prosthetist to develop a set of unique clubs.

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Superflipper Puts Amputees in the Competitive Swim

NeptuneFit and athletic amputees – like sprinter/long-jumper Aimee Mullins – have proved over and over that the loss of a limb is no reason to give up sports. Amputee swimmers, however, have been held back — until now. Enter Neptune, a colorful but functional superflipper designed for competitive amputee swimmers.

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